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Boulder and Louie Lakes

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Must Have When Hiking: GPS Handheld Device

For the last few miles on the way to the Boulder Lake Trailhead, we were following two buses. School buses. School buses full of peppy children excited for their long-awaited day out. “I can’t believe this”, I hissed at Jürgen. And, of course, they were going on the exact same hike as us. We parked, put on our boots, and then waded into the mess of screaming, happy kids. Off on our big day of pristine nature and peaceful solitude.

Boulder Lake Hike

But despite the inauspicious start, we managed to have a nice time. Quick and inexhaustible little monkeys when alone or in small groups, children slow down considerably when congregated into large herds. We passed them immediately and didn’t slacken our pace until their piercing voices had completely faded into the distance.

So we arrived at Boulder Lake in almost no time at all. It was a moderately difficult hike, through the woods, following a stream uphill, but the view of the dammed-up lake was worth the effort. Set high in a range of granite mountains, Boulder Lake was large and blessfully quiet. We paused for awhile on the ramparts and scouted for wildlife; and only continued on our way when we heard the wild pack of kids nearing behind us.

The path continued east to the unsigned trail which would take us to Louie Lake. Before setting out, it’s worth stopping at the McCall ranger station to get a detailed explanation of the route — we would never have spotted the trail if we hadn’t known exactly what to look for, and where to look for it.

I figured that, after climbing up to Boulder Lake, we were as high as we’d get for the day, but the trail to Louie Lake continued even further uphill. Luckily, the nature was so entrancing that we hardly noticed. By now, the children were a distant memory and the only signs of life were chirping birds and the occasional, curious chipmunk. The views from the highest point of the hike were incredible — the Long Valley of McCall to the west, and nothing but autumn-colored mountains to the east.

We descended until reaching Louie Lake, which was just as big and beautiful as Boulder. From here, it was another mile back to our car. It was a loop of seven miles, which took almost five hours to complete, owing for lunch and photo breaks. Strenuous, but not overly so, it made for an excellent day hike.

Location of the Boulder Lake Trailhead | Beginning of Louie Lake Trail

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September 24, 2012 at 2:33 am Comments (0)

A Labor Day Hike to Loon Lake

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Andes Hike

A popular walking loop leads from the Chinook Campground in the Payette National Forest, along the banks of the Sesech River to the majestic Loon Lake. We woke up early on the Sunday of Labor Day weekend to tackle the hike, which impressed us not only with its beauty, but with a fascinating piece of history hidden within the woods.

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For the first few miles of the hike, we followed the Secesh River, shining brilliantly in the morning light. It’s pronounced “SEE-shesh”, with its roots in the word “secessionist”. After the Civil War, gold prospectors from all over the nation settled in nearby Warren. Conflict inevitably arose between the former Union and Confederate loyalists, and tribal lines were drawn. Northerners stayed in a part of Warren which they coined Washington, while Southerners settled across the river, henceforth known as the Secesch.

Loon-Lake-Airplane-Crash

In February of 1943, a B-23 Bomber got lost in the snowy mountains of Idaho. Short of fuel, the eight-man crew searched desperately for a place to touch down. In the nick of time, they spotted Loon Lake: frozen over and just spacious enough to attempt a landing. The plane skidded across the ice and crashed into the trees on the lake’s southern shore.

Everyone survived the rough landing, but they weren’t yet out of danger. Completely lost in the wild back-country of Idaho, they had no means of communicating their location, or any idea as to where they were. For fifteen days, they held on, reduced to eating bark, leaves and squirrel. Lucikly, a commercial pilot from Warren eventually discovered the wreckage, and was able to rescue the crew, all eight of whom survived.

The wreckage from the Chinook Bomber is still in the woods, near Loon Lake. After 69 years, it’s more intact than I would have believed. We walked around the bomber, and poked our heads into the wheel well and cockpit. A stirring testament to man’s will to survive.

The trek back to the car was long; five miles through burnt forest, with Labor Day traffic to contend with. This is a popular trail for dirt-bikes, which hindered us from truly enjoying the scenery. Every time a bike blasted by, we’d be suffocated for a couple minutes by the dust it kicked up. It was the wrong weekend to be on this trail; my eyes were sore, and I was coughing up dirt by the time we arrived back at the car.

Locations: Chinook Campground Trailhead | B-23 Bomber Remains

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September 5, 2012 at 4:13 pm Comments (4)
Boulder and Louie Lakes For the last few miles on the way to the Boulder Lake Trailhead, we were following two buses. School buses. School buses full of peppy children excited for their long-awaited day out. "I can't believe this", I hissed at Jürgen. And, of course, they were going on the exact same hike as us. We parked, put on our boots, and then waded into the mess of screaming, happy kids. Off on our big day of pristine nature and peaceful solitude.
For 91 Days