Idaho Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

Goldbug Hot Springs

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Hot Springs of the Northwest

The best hidden gem we uncovered during our travels through Idaho was the Goldbug Hot Springs. Found at the end of a beautiful and moderately-rough hike through a canyon just south of Salmon, these cascading hot springs offer an idyllic experience, far off the beaten track.

Goldbug-Hot-Spring-Idaho

We had been completely unaware of Goldbug’s existence until finding a flyer about it in Salmon’s Chamber of Commerce. It wasn’t in any of the guide books we read, and even most of the locals we would talk with later, from Challis to Sun Valley, hadn’t heard of it. Or perhaps, they pretended not to have heard of it. Goldbug is a paradise, and there’s no better way to ruin paradise than by attracting too many tourists to it.

The trail to the hot springs gets started here in a small parking lot just off Highway 93. The two-mile trail initially skirts through private property, but soon enters public land and becomes increasingly gorgeous as it follows a small stream into a mountain valley. Even without the promise of hot springs, the trail would itself make a great excursion. The final stretch is strenuous, going up into the hills, but the reward waiting at the end makes it all worthwhile.

The Goldbug Hot Springs are a collection of five or six pools complete with waterfalls and a view over an unforgettable valley landscape. The pools are of varying temperatures; warmer nearer the source, cooler further down, but never too hot nor too cold. And the waterfalls are the crowining touch; I sat underneath one for about fifteen minutes, just letting the hot water pound my shoulders and neck. Even if there are other groups visiting the hot springs, the number of pools almost guarantees some solitude.

We stayed much longer than we had planned, and felt like we were floating on clouds during the walk back to the car. Apologies to all the residents of Salmon and Challis who would like to keep Goldbug secret. We can totally understand that. But this is a piece of nature so incredible, that it simply must be shared.

Location of the Trailhead on our Idaho Map

Find us on Facebook

Idaho Fall
Little Stream Idaho
Goldbug Hike
Starting A Hike
Idaho Hut
Idaho Cotton
Rough Hike Idaho
Half Way
Hot Spring Waterfall
Hot Spring Fall
Idaho Blogger
Happy Hot Spring
Hot Springs Idaho

, , , , , , , , , , ,
November 8, 2012 at 4:52 pm Comments (10)

The Salmon River Scenic Byway

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Rent Your Car Here For Your Next Idaho Road-Trip

Idaho has no lack of scenic byways. There are 30 which criss-cross the state, and during our six-week road-trip through Idaho, we made an effort to complete as many as possible. Each had something recommend it, from historical sites, to crazy geological formations or interesting towns. But for amazing scenery, none beats the Salmon River Scenic Byway.

Idaho-Road-Trip

This byway begins at the Lost Trail Pass, on the border between Montana and Idaho. From here, it’s a 161-mile journey along Highway 93 to Stanley, through Salmon and Challis. Both of these small towns are worth a stop, Salmon for recreational opportunities on the river and Challis for the Sacajawea Interpretive Center, but it’s the nature you’ll remember most. The byway hugs the mighty Salmon River along its southwest course, offering landscapes that have changed little in the past 200 years, when Lewis and Clark arrived over the Lost Trail Pass.

The road passes from the Salmon National Forest into the Challis National Forest, and wildlife-viewing opportunities are excellent the whole way. We stopped and hauled out the binoculars multiple times. Outside Challis, a bald eagle soared over our heads. White-tailed deer fed in distant pastures. And most excitingly, we found a large group of bighorn sheep grazing along the side of the river, 30 miles north of Stanley.

At first, we thought they were deer and whizzed by the herd quickly, but something about them made Jürgen take pause, so we looped back around to get a better look. Turns out, Bighorn Sheep are awfully similar in appearance to deer — at least the females and youngsters, who don’t have the distinctive, curly horns. Although safely off the endangered species list, they like to keep out of sight and are a rare sight.

As we approached Stanley along Highway 93, the Sawtooth Mountains came into view for the first time. With a number of peaks that reach over 10,000 feet in height, the Sawtooths are hailed as one of the last great “undiscovered” climbing destinations in America. Hundreds of alpine lakes dot the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, and the region’s remoteness almost guarantees a lack of crowds, regardless of the time of year.

-Find Us On Facebook

Female Bighorn Sheep
Sacajawea-Interpretive-Center
Bear Fishing
US-Mail-Salmon-Florence
Road-Trip-Idaho
Classic-Idaho-Road-Trip
Idaho-Hills
Idaho Lake
Idaho-Rivers
Idaho Sprinkler
Idaho Spider
Arch-Idaho
Beautiful Idaho
Idaho Travel
Idaho travel Blog
Teton

, , , , , , , ,
November 7, 2012 at 5:58 pm Comment (1)

Sockeye Salmon and Other Idahoan Rarities

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Like Us On Facebook

Sockeye-salmon

These red-bodied, green-headed Sockeye (or Kokanee) Salmon were just one of the unexpected things we saw during our first month Idaho. Every day, the state seems to be scouring its shelves, finding bizarre new curiosities for our camera. Here are some of the best pictures we’ve taken over the past month.

-Rent Your Car For Your Idaho Road-Trip Here

Idaho-Pelican
Almost-Like-a-Vulcano
Dead-Tree-Of-Idaho
Cattle-Farm
Idaho Cows
Idaho-Road-Trio
Idaho Sun
Morning-Mist
American Eagle
Bird Take Off
Bleeding Tree
Broken-Car-Idaho
Heidi Idaho
/Idaho-Cream-Pie
Conversational-Coffee-Table-Piece
Idaho Spud
Moose Drool
Jump To Me
Wonder Washer
Top-Hat-American
Idaho Dead End
Funnel Tunnel
Venus Fly Trip
We wont Dial 911

, , , , , , , ,
September 29, 2012 at 1:33 am Comments (2)